Feelin used again hahahahaha ☺️🔫

Marriage is a mosque- don’t tear it down.”
Green churidars, gold bangles, the gossip of empty cupboards.
“Marriage is -” Green churidars, gold bangles, “You are from
a good family, he is from a good family.” “He is a doctor, well-
educated man, how can he do this?” A broken set of porcelain
tableware; the imaam, kind and ignorant, gives good advice.
“Marriage is a mosque- pray in it, have patience in it, sabr,
women must have sabr, women can-” “Think of your family,
your parents have such a good reputation; the woman waits
and then everything is alright. He is a good man, he has a degree,
his family has no scandal, he wears polished black, black, black shoes.”
Somebody in a fit of anger broke the dining room table. Good oak.
“He is a good man, he just can’t control himself. A mosque is a marriage-
don’t tear it down and don’t walk with your shoes into it.” Your child
is seeing the psychologist, he smashed your face into the bathroom
mirror because- He is a good man, but he just can’t control himself sometimes.
The gossip of empty cupboards. “Women must have patience, sabr. He will
change. And if he doesn’t, so what? Women must- He is a good man,
from a good family, doesn’t mean it.

Marriage is a Mosque - Ameerah Arjanee 

This is a poem I wrote about a year ago about my observations in my own South Asian/Mauritian Muslim community, about how domestic violence remains a taboo subject — something people and even (or maybe especially) religious leaders remain uneducated about and quick to think can be solved by mere patience/sabr/prayers from women. This attitude doesn’t come from bad intentions, but simply from: a lack of education about the real causes of domestic violence (the man is consciously abusing power, not possessed by a jinn); the severity of its physical and psychological damage, the pragmatic steps to take to help the woman in question, and the overriding fear of gossip and tainting the “family reputation.”

(via rabbrakha)

(Source: faineemae)

paintdeath:

full time hoe online….very shy hoe irl

tasnimsmentalroadtrip:

Please stop. Have some dignity. Stop crawling around after people trying to get their attention like a damn puppy. You are a brilliant individual with so much going for you, so get up and dust yourself off. Focus on yourself instead. They’re never going to give you the satisfaction that you’re searching for. Only you can do that, by keeping your chin up and valuing yourself. You don’t need permission to be amazing. You already are.

Muma & Unza, cuties since day one ☺️

fatima-thinks:

Don’t talk to boys. They’re pathetic and give anything that breathes hella attention and never mean what they say.
Based on a true story.

neurologiques:

Black is tired but powerful mwhahah

Hey lil mama 😏

neurologiques:

I miss someone.

Me.
It’s okay bby, I miss you too.

It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “Black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the Black and [Latin@] and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.


comment left on the Racialious blog post “Sustainable Food & Privilege: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)” (via coveredinsecurity)

(Source: trilliswheatley)

islamographic:

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